not today

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no rain today, prayed for or unbidden
no dinosaurs, no asteroids, no plague

no sliver moon or morning star to guide you
no handsome stranger standing at the gate

no inspiration falling from the heavens
no voice of God in burning bush or cave

 

no poetry in everyday existence
when you decide to always play it safe

 

 

This was written in response to the April 2, 2017 challenge from Poetic Asides to write a “Not Today” poem.

The Loss

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My fumbling fingers on the bracelet’s clasp
feel so useless as the sudden drop
sends beads a-skitter, here, there,
under the desk where they evade my grasp.

Some may coast their happy way
to oblivious senescence.
But I have other needs —
needs to reach and find and still to grasp.

 

 

This was written in response to Miz Quickly’s final prompt for the month of March.

 

 

Multitudes Contained

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Coffee in a cup, dark brown
and fragrant,
stray bubbles where liquid meets
cup — coffee contained, still

containing a microcosm of
atoms from faraway lands,
unintended immigrants
to a brave new world
bathed in liquid warmth,
echoing a tropical breeze.

Transformation awaits —
the touch of cool lips and
the long slow slide to the dark unknown,
still the bean and its brew live on.

This poem was written for Miz Quickly’s 3/23 prompt here.

Perpetuity

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ideas like child’s play
turning, returning, again and again
images spun in sand and light
rolodex of the mind in perpetual motion

spin, repeat, release

This poem was written in response to the January 2, 2017 prompt from Miz Quickly.

Rio 1502

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Rio 1502

Three small ships, that first of the year,
bear mapmakers from a distant shore,
weary men, painstaking work. Men suddenly
elated to come upon the mouth of a mighty river
ringed by mountains in the warm summer breeze,
River “discovered” in Janeiro and so christened.

Did anyone ask if the river had another name?
A true name, a name full of magic and power now lost
to those who do not hear. A different reality.

Guanabara — “arm of the sea,” forever a river
in name only.

This poem was written in response to the January 1, 2017 prompt from Miz Quickly.

NaPoWriMo 04/13 Fortune(ate)

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fortune-cookies-936584_1920
 
 
 
The NaPoWriMo prompt for today is as follows:
“And now for today’s (optional) prompt! The number 13 is often considered unlucky, so today I’d like to challenge you to beat the bad luck away with a poem inspired by fortune cookies. You could write a poem made up entirely of statements that predict the future (“You will meet a handsome stranger”), aphoristic statements (“The secret to getting ahead is getting started)” or just silly questions (“How much deeper would the ocean be without sponges?”) Or you could use a phrase you’ve actually received in a real fortune cookie as a title or first line. However you proceed, I hope you will feel fortunate in the results (do you get it? Do you get it? Rimshot, please). Happy writing!”

Until today, I had no idea that there is a website entitled “The Fortune Cookie Message Archive.” I spent a bit of time there today to create a pep talk for a reluctant poet of a certain age. I selected only four word fortunes and, for fun, included one four-word quote from Anne Lamott, a writer whose gifts include the ability to inspire other writers.

 
 

Fortune favors the brave.
Be most affectionate today.
Good things take time.
Treasure what you have.
Use your instincts now.
Unleash your life force.
Let your fantasies unwind.
Reality is unforgivingly complex.

Stop wishing; start doing.
Aim high; time flies.
Happiness is an activity.
Life is a verb.
Become who you are.
Let the deeds speak.
 
 

(to) achieve solitude NaPoWriMo 04/12/16

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(to) achieve solitude

being totally honest
black and white thinking

creation of alternative worlds
dislike of sentimentality
fantasy worlds/super-heroes
inability to cope

mental exhaustion/paranoia
remembering what to do
vocalization of thoughts
when listening to others

solitude
 
 
 
For the NaPoWriMo prompt of April 12, we were challenged to create an index poem, based on words and phrases found in the index of a book. This poem is sourced from words and phrases found in the index of The Complete Guide to Asperger’s Syndrome by Tony Attwood, Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London and Philadelphia, 2007.